President Personally Welcomes American Citizen Detainees from North Korea: New Procedure with Risks

Analysis, Foreign Affairs
, by The recent return of three detainees from North Korea and the way in which they were welcomed back from Pyongyang, has a number of unique features that suggest significant changes by the Trump Administration from procedures that have been followed by previous administration over the previous decade. Releasing American citizens, who were detained for spurious reasons in the first place, might better be handled with less fanfare to discourage attempts to exploit future incidents.

Protecting North Korean Refugees: Testimony Before the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee

Human Rights, Refugees & Migration
, by Testimony of Ambassador Robert R. King before House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee Hearing on “Protecting North Korean Refugees.” The United States' human rights efforts are an important aspect of our policy toward North Korea. We must not underestimate the value and importance of these efforts.

Promoting Democracy, Human Rights, and the Rule of Law

Governance, Human Rights
, by One of the most important recent steps forward was the creation of the United Nations Commission of Inquiry on DPRK human rights violations and its ground-breaking report which was issued in 2014. That report concluded that the DPRK regime systematically violated the human rights of its own people—including freedom of thought, expression and religion; freedom from discrimination; freedom of movement and residence; and the right to food.

Travel to North Korea: Should it be Prohibited in the Aftermath of American Student’s Death?

Foreign Affairs, Governance, Human Rights
, by The tragic death of Otto Warmbier has again raised the question of whether travel to North Korea ought to be prohibited by the United States government. Prohibiting travel by Americans to North Korea has been talked about for some time, primarily on Capitol Hill. Arguments for a travel ban are (1) to protect the safety and wellbeing of American citizens; and (2) travel is a source of hard currency for the Kim regime which goes to the “royal economy” for imported French cognac and luxury automobiles for the young leader, as well as to fund nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles.